News & Announcements

News For You

Posted on: April 11, 2019

Preparing for Severe Spring Weather

severe weather preparedness

Severe weather can happen anywhere, at any time, creating potentially life threatening situations. Are you and your family prepared? Review this information from Ready.gov to prepare for severe information.


Build A Kit


Make sure your emergency kit is stocked with the items on the checklist below. Most of the items are inexpensive and easy to find, and any one of them could save your life. Headed to the store? Download a printable version to take with you. Once you take a look at the basic items, consider what unique needs your family might have, such as supplies for pets, or seniors.

After an emergency, you may need to survive on your own for several days. Being prepared means having your own foodwater and other supplies to last for at least 72 hours. A disaster supplies kit is a collection of basic items your household may need in the event of an emergency.

Basic Disaster Supplies Kit

To assemble your kit, store items in airtight plastic bags and put your entire disaster supplies kit in one or two easy-to-carry containers such as plastic bins or a duffel bag.

A basic emergency supply kit could include the following recommended items:

  • Water - one gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation
  • Food - at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food
  • Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert
  • Flashlight
  • First aid kit
  • Extra batteries
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Dust mask to help filter contaminated air and plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place
  • Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation
  • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
  • Manual can opener for food
  • Local maps
  • Cell phone with chargers and a backup battery

Download the Recommended Supplies List (PDF)

Additional Emergency Supplies

Consider adding the following items to your emergency supply kit based on your individual needs:

  • Prescription medications
  • Non-prescription medications such as pain relievers, anti-diarrhea medication, antacids or laxatives
  • Glasses and contact lense solution
  • Infant formula, bottles, diapers, wipes, diaper rash cream
  • Pet food and extra water for your pet
  • Cash or traveler's checks
  • Important family documents such as copies of insurance policies, identification and bank account records saved electronically or in a waterproof, portable container
  • Sleeping bag or warm blanket for each person
  • Complete change of clothing appropriate for your climate and sturdy shoes
  • Household chlorine bleach and medicine dropper to disinfect water
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Matches in a waterproof container
  • Feminine supplies and personal hygiene items
  • Mess kits, paper cups, plates, paper towels and plastic utensils
  • Paper and pencil
  • Books, games, puzzles or other activities for children

Maintaining Your Kit

After assembling your kit remember to maintain it so it’s ready when needed:

  • Keep canned food in a cool, dry place
  • Store boxed food in tightly closed plastic or metal containers
  • Replace expired items as needed
  • Re-think your needs every year and update your kit as your family’s needs change.

Kit Storage Locations

Since you do not know where you will be when an emergency occurs, prepare supplies for home, work and vehicles.

  • Home: Keep this kit in a designated place and have it ready in case you have to leave your home quickly. Make sure all family members know where the kit is kept.
  • Work: Be prepared to shelter at work for at least 24 hours. Your work kit should include food, water and other necessities like medicines, as well as comfortable walking shoes, stored in a “grab and go” case.
  • Vehicle: In case you are stranded, keep a kit of emergency supplies in your car.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Thunderstorms & Lightning


Lightning is a leading cause of injury and death from weather-related hazards. Although most lightning victims survive, people struck by lightning often report a variety of long-term, debilitating symptoms. Thunderstorms are dangerous storms that include lightning and can:

IF YOU ARE UNDER A THUNDERSTORM WARNING, FIND SAFE SHELTER RIGHT AWAY

When thunder roars, go indoors!

  • Move from outdoors into a building or car.
    • Pay attention to alerts and warnings.
    • Unplug appliances 
    • Do not use landline phones.

HOW TO STAY SAFE WHEN A THUNDERSTORM THREATENS


Prepare NOW

  • Know your area’s risk for thunderstorms. In most places, they can occur year-round and at any hour.Sign up for your community’s warning system. 
  • The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts.Identify nearby, sturdy buildings close to where you live, work, study, and play.
  • Cut down or trim trees that may be in danger of falling on your home.
  • Consider buying surge protectors, lightning rods, or a lightning protection system to protect your home, appliances, and electronic devices.

Survive DURING

  • When thunder roars, go indoors. A sturdy building is the safest place to be during a thunderstorm.
  • Pay attention to weather reports and warnings of thunderstorms. Be ready to change plans, if necessary, to be near shelter.
  • When you receive a thunderstorm warning or hear thunder, go inside immediately.
  • If indoors, avoid running water or using landline phones. Electricity can travel through plumbing and phone lines.
  • Protect your property. Unplug appliances and other electric devices. Secure outside furniture.
  • If boating or swimming, get to land and find a sturdy, grounded shelter or vehicle immediately.
  • If necessary, take shelter in a car with a metal top and sides. Do not touch anything metal.
  • Avoid flooded roadways. Turn Around. Don’t Drown! Just six inches of fast-moving water can knock you down, and one foot of moving water can sweep your vehicle away.

Be Safe AFTER

  • Listen to authorities and weather forecasts for information on whether it is safe to go outside and instructions regarding potential flash flooding.
  • Watch for fallen power lines and trees. Report them immediately.

Associated Content


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Tornadoes


Tornadoes can destroy buildings, flip cars, and create deadly flying debris. Tornadoes are violently rotating columns of air that extend from a thunderstorm to the ground. Tornadoes can:

  • Happen anytime and anywhere;
  • Bring intense winds, over 200 MPH; and
  • Look like funnels.
 IF YOU ARE UNDER A TORNADO WARNING, FIND SAFE SHELTER RIGHT AWAY
  • If you can safely get to a sturdy building, then do so immediately.
  • Go to a safe room, basement, or storm cellar.
  • If you are in a building with no basement, then get to a small interior room on the lowest level.
  • Stay away from windows, doors, and outside walls.
  • Do not get under an overpass or bridge. You’re safer in a low, flat location.
  • Watch out for flying debris that can cause injury or death.
  • Use your arms to protect your head and neck.

HOW TO STAY SAFE WHEN A TORNADO THREATENS

Prepare NOW

  • Know your area’s tornado risk. In the U.S., the Midwest and the Southeast have a greater risk for tornadoes.
  • Know the signs of a tornado, including a rotating, funnel-shaped cloud; an approaching cloud of debris; or a loud roar—similar to a freight train.
  • Sign up for your community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts. If your community has sirens, then become familiar with the warning tone.
  • Pay attention to weather reports. Meteorologists can predict when conditions might be right for a tornado.
  • Identify and practice going to a safe shelter in the event of high winds, such as a safe room built using FEMA criteria or a storm shelter built to ICC 500 standards. The next best protection is a small, interior, windowless room on the lowest level of a sturdy building.
  • Consider constructing your own safe room that meets FEMA or ICC 500 standards.

 Survive DURING

  • Immediately go to a safe location that you identified.
  • Take additional cover by shielding your head and neck with your arms and putting materials such as furniture and blankets around you.
  • Listen to EAS, NOAA Weather Radio, or local alerting systems for current emergency information and instructions.
  • Do not try to outrun a tornado in a vehicle.
  • If you are in a car or outdoors and cannot get to a building, cover your head and neck with your arms and cover your body with a coat or blanket, if possible.

Be Safe AFTER

  • Keep listening to EAS, NOAA Weather Radio, and local authorities for updated information.
  • If you are trapped, cover your mouth with a cloth or mask to avoid breathing dust. Try to send a text, bang on a pipe or wall, or use a whistle instead of shouting.
  • Stay clear of fallen power lines or broken utility lines.
  • Do not enter damaged buildings until you are told that they are safe.
  • Save your phone calls for emergencies. Phone systems are often down or busy after a disaster. Use text messaging or social media to communicate with family and friends.
  • Be careful during clean-up. Wear thick-soled shoes, long pants, and work gloves.

Associated Content


Facebook Twitter Email

Other News in News For You

2ColorLombardLogo (2)

Video Gaming Workshop: March 7th

Posted on: March 1, 2019
winterweather

Winter Storm Updates

Posted on: January 28, 2019
scam-alert

SCAM Alert!

Posted on: January 10, 2019
2ColorLombardLogo (2)

101 South Main Redevelopment Update

Posted on: December 18, 2018
boat storage

RV Winter Parking Reminders

Posted on: November 1, 2018
Teen Driving Safety Week

Teen Driving Safety Week: Oct. 21 - 27

Posted on: October 18, 2018
coffee with a cop

National Coffee With a Cop Day

Posted on: September 20, 2018
fall pride 2018

Fall Pride Available Online!

Posted on: September 13, 2018
recycle 1

Recycling Extravaganza Returns September 22

Posted on: September 13, 2018
construction cones and hat 240 pxl

Construction Updates

Posted on: August 9, 2018
Cruise Nights Logo 2018

July 14 Cruise Night Update

Posted on: July 14, 2018
pw logo 2018 rev

May 30, 2018 Storm Update

Posted on: May 31, 2018
one call wreck it all

Distracted Driving Awareness Month

Posted on: April 2, 2018
state of the village 2018

2018 State of the Village

Posted on: February 23, 2018
snow-update

Snow Event Updates: Feb. 8 - Feb 9

Posted on: February 9, 2018
tree trim 240

2018 Winter Tree Trimming Begins

Posted on: January 12, 2018
Composting

Composting In the Village of Lombard

Posted on: January 5, 2018
water-main-break

ALERT: Water Main Breaks

Posted on: January 4, 2018
Ice and Snow Logo

Winter Driving Safety Reminders

Posted on: December 28, 2017
pd logo

Click It Or Ticket Thanksgiving Results

Posted on: December 15, 2017
holiday hours 240

Village Offices Closed for Holidays

Posted on: December 15, 2017
jbelljubilee2017b

JingleBell Jubilee 2017

Posted on: December 1, 2017
shop with a cop

Lombard's 19th Annual Shop With A Cop

Posted on: November 29, 2017
skunk

Tips on How to Deter and Prevent Skunks

Posted on: October 27, 2017
EndConstr

Gatz Pond Outfall Project nears completion

Posted on: September 22, 2017
Labor Day

Lombard Offices Closed for Labor Day

Posted on: August 28, 2017
Graceful Blooms Stacie Popowski

2017 Photo Contest Winners Announced

Posted on: June 16, 2017
construction cones and hat 240 pxl

Maple Street Detour begins June 17

Posted on: June 15, 2017
ThinkstockPhotos-487167376

Heat Safety Tips and Reminders

Posted on: June 9, 2017
construction cones and hat 240 pxl

Well House Scheduled for Demolition

Posted on: April 4, 2017
water.jpg

Aqua Backflow Survey Issued to Residents

Posted on: January 23, 2017
sewer debris 240.jpg

Public Works to conduct street sweeping

Posted on: January 20, 2017
Lombard Police Badge.jpg

Shop With A Cop 2016

Posted on: November 29, 2016
parking sign 240.jpg

Metra Pay Boxes Error Update

Posted on: August 10, 2016
prescription drug take back DEA.jpg

Drug Take Back Day: April 30

Posted on: April 29, 2016
wind.jpg

Wind Storm Clean Up

Posted on: February 22, 2016
mlk.jpg

Village Hall and Offices Closed Jan. 18

Posted on: January 15, 2016
snow storm.jpg

Winter Storm Update: Dec. 29, 2015

Posted on: December 29, 2015
IMG_9517_thumb.jpg

Lombard's 17th Annual Shop with a Cop

Posted on: December 11, 2015
Pride Newsletter

Lombard Pride Available Online

Posted on: December 1, 2015
shoveling snow240.jpg

Sidewalk Snow Removal: Who's Responsible?

Posted on: November 23, 2015